Publications

Adolescent sexual violence: Prevalence, adolescent risks, and violence characteristics

The purpose of this research is to investigate peer-to-peer sexual violence victimization and perpetration among male and female adolescents in a large, racially and economically diverse, community-based sample. Using cross-sectional data over a four-year period (2009-2013) from a regional sample of middle school and high school students in southeastern Michigan, we examined the prevalence and correlates of peer-to-peer sexual violence victimization and perpetration among adolescents. 33.9% of males and 53.5% of females reported sexual violence victimization, while 22.8% of males and 12.6% of females reported sexual violence perpetration. The majority of peer-to-peer sexual victimization and perpetration occurred by someone of the opposite sex, however, same-sex victimization and perpetration were not uncommon. Substance use, depression, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and conduct disorder were associated with peer-to-peer sexual violence (victimization or perpetration) for both males and females, with few differences in the patterns of associations by sex. These findings are an important step in better understanding the types of peer-to-peer sexual violence that adolescents experience and risk factors for both male and female youth.