Publications

Long-Term Effects of Research-Based and Practice-Based Job Search Interventions: An RCT Reevaluation

Objective:This study reevaluates the effects of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of job search interventions on labor force participation. In the trial, various methods of job search interventions were included, of which about half were research-based JOBS (Job Opportunity and Basic Skills) interventions and the other half were practice-based, that is, without a theoretical or empirical base. This study compares effects of the research-based and practice-based interventions.Methods:The trial included data from 1998 to 2000 of 1,013 unemployed people in Finland with 3-year follow-up data from official labor market records. Multilevel multinomial logistic regression was used to analyze the intervention effects on labor market outcomes.Results:The results demonstrated that beneficial long-term effects were produced only in interventions based on the research-based JOBS method for participants at risk of baseline depression. In contrast, the practice-based interventions seemed to have adverse effects on employment.Conclusions:These findings indicate the importance of research-based interventions within active labor market policies.; Objective:This study reevaluates the effects of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of job search interventions on labor force participation. In the trial, various methods of job search interventions were included, of which about half were research-based JOBS (Job Opportunity and Basic Skills) interventions and the other half were practice-based, that is, without a theoretical or empirical base. This study compares effects of the research-based and practice-based interventions.Methods:The trial included data from 1998 to 2000 of 1,013 unemployed people in Finland with 3-year follow-up data from official labor market records. Multilevel multinomial logistic regression was used to analyze the intervention effects on labor market outcomes.Results:The results demonstrated that beneficial long-term effects were produced only in interventions based on the research-based JOBS method for participants at risk of baseline depression. In contrast, the practice-based interventions seemed to have adverse effects on employment.Conclusions:These findings indicate the importance of research-based interventions within active labor market policies.