Publications

Non-Medical Use of Prescription Analgesics: A Three-Year National Longitudinal Study

ABSTRACT This secondary analysis of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) data examined the non-medical use of prescription analgesics and determined its relationship to continued non-medical use and substance use disorders 3 years later. Prospective data were collected using the Alcohol Use Disorders and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule: DSM-IV Version (AUDADIS-DSM-IV). A nationally representative sample (n = 34,653) of U.S. adults 18 years or older were interviewed at Wave 1 (2001?2002) and re-interviewed at Wave 2 (2004?2005). Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated younger age (18 to 24 years) and non-medical use at Wave 1 was associated with higher odds of a general substance or opioid use disorder at Wave 2 (adjusted odds ratio = 3.42, 95% confidence interval = 1.45, 8.07); however, most respondents who engaged in non-medical use will cease using 3 years later although non-medical use is associated with higher prevalence of a future substance use disorder.; ABSTRACT This secondary analysis of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) data examined the non-medical use of prescription analgesics and determined its relationship to continued non-medical use and substance use disorders 3 years later. Prospective data were collected using the Alcohol Use Disorders and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule: DSM-IV Version (AUDADIS-DSM-IV). A nationally representative sample (n = 34,653) of U.S. adults 18 years or older were interviewed at Wave 1 (2001?2002) and re-interviewed at Wave 2 (2004?2005). Multivariate logistic regression analyses indicated younger age (18 to 24 years) and non-medical use at Wave 1 was associated with higher odds of a general substance or opioid use disorder at Wave 2 (adjusted odds ratio = 3.42, 95% confidence interval = 1.45, 8.07); however, most respondents who engaged in non-medical use will cease using 3 years later although non-medical use is associated with higher prevalence of a future substance use disorder.