Publications

Technology and interactive social media use among 8th and 10th graders in the U.S. and associations with homework and school grades

This study examined differences by age, gender, and race/ethnicity in the use of technology and interactive social media from 2013-2016 using data from nationally-representative samples of U.S. 8th and 10th graders (N=40,389). Results indicated that 8th graders watch TV and play video games more than 10th graders; boys play more video games and use interactive social media less than girls; and Black adolescents use most forms of media more often than those from other race/ethnicity groups, with the exception of using the computer for school reported most often by Asian adolescents. Mean differences showed that adolescents who spend more time on homework spend more time using the computer for school, and spend less time watching weekday TV, playing video games, and talking on the phone. Adolescents with higher grades spend more time using the computer for school and spend less time on all other types of technology and interactive social media, except for watching weekend TV. Multivariable logistic regression results indicate that watching TV on a weekday was consistently negatively associated with academic outcomes and using the computer for school was consistently positively associated with academic outcomes.